Alternatives | Global Macro

Invesco Macro Allocation Strategy Fund

Class A

Class A

  • Class A
  • Class C
  • Class R
  • Class R5
  • Class R6
  • Class Y
Ticker: GMSDX

Objective & Strategy

The fund seeks a positive absolute return over a complete economic and market cycle.

Management team

as of 5/31/2022

Top Holdings | View all

  % of Total net assets
MACQ BCOM Opt Curve (Long) 33.06%
XM Australian 10 Year Bond Future 25.21%
RX Euro-Bund Future 17.04%
Z FTSE 100 Future 11.29%
PT TSE 60 Futures 11.07%
US US Long Bond Future 8.11%
BARC BCOM Opt Curve (Long) 7.92%
TP Topix Futures 6.82%
IVZ Idx EM Mmntm Vol Net TR Swap 4.77%
MSCI Emerg Low Vol TR Swap 4.58%

Holdings are subject to change and are not buy/sell recommendations.

as of 10/31/2022 09/30/2022

Average Annual Returns (%)

  Incept.
Date
Max
Load (%)
Since
Incept. (%)
YTD (%) 1Y (%) 3Y (%) 5Y (%) 10Y (%)
NAV 08/28/2013 N/A N/A -10.98 -9.88 -2.10 -0.61 1.91
Load 08/28/2013 5.50 N/A -15.85 -14.81 -3.92 -1.74 1.33
NAV 08/28/2013 N/A N/A -11.10 -9.00 -1.83 -0.22 1.78
Load 08/28/2013 5.50 N/A -15.96 -14.03 -3.68 -1.35 1.21

Performance quoted is past performance and cannot guarantee comparable future results; current performance may be lower or higher. Investment return and principal value will vary so that you may have a gain or a loss when you sell shares.
 

Performance shown at NAV does not include applicable front-end or CDSC sales charges, which would have reduced the performance.

Performance figures reflect reinvested distributions and changes in net asset value (NAV) and the effect of the maximum sales charge unless otherwise stated.

as of

Annualized Benchmark Returns


Index Name 1 Mo (%) 3 Mo (%) 1Y (%) 3Y (%) 5Y (%) 10Y (%)
Bloomberg US Treasury Bellwethers 3 Months Total Return Index 0.34 0.74 1.13 0.66 1.23 0.74
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Bloomberg U.S. Treasury Bellwethers (3M) Index 0.22 0.46 0.62 0.60 1.16 0.70
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Source: FactSet Research Systems Inc.

Source: Bloomberg LP

An investment cannot be made directly in an index.

Expense Ratio per Prospectus

Management Fee 1.10
12b-1 Fee 0.25
Other Expenses 0.27
Interest/Dividend Exp N/A
Total Other Expenses 0.27
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses (Underlying Fund Fees & Expenses) 0.05
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 1.67
Contractual Waivers/Reimbursements -0.20
Net Expenses - PER PROSPECTUS 1.47
Additional Waivers/Reimbursements N/A
Net Expenses - With Additional Fee Reduction 1.47
This information is updated per the most recent prospectus.

Historical Prices

 
No history records found for this date range
Date Net Asset Value ($) Public Offering Price ($)
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Distributions

From   to
    Capital Gains Reinvestment
Price ($)
Ex-Date Income Short Term Long Term
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as of 10/31/2022

Fund Characteristics

3-Year Alpha -2.70%
3-Year Beta -3.69
3-Year R-Squared 0.01
3-Year Sharpe Ratio -0.37
3-Year Standard Deviation 7.44
Number of Securities 62
Total Assets $156,111,174.00

Source: Bloomberg LP,StyleADVISOR

Benchmark:  Bloomberg US Treasury Bellwethers 3 Months Total Return Index

as of 5/31/2022

Top Holdings | View all

  % of Total net assets
MACQ BCOM Opt Curve (Long) 33.06%
XM Australian 10 Year Bond Future 25.21%
RX Euro-Bund Future 17.04%
Z FTSE 100 Future 11.29%
PT TSE 60 Futures 11.07%
US US Long Bond Future 8.11%
BARC BCOM Opt Curve (Long) 7.92%
TP Topix Futures 6.82%
IVZ Idx EM Mmntm Vol Net TR Swap 4.77%
MSCI Emerg Low Vol TR Swap 4.58%

Holdings are subject to change and are not buy/sell recommendations.

as of 10/31/2022

Top Industries

  % of Total Assets
Diversified Banks 7.10

May not equal 100% due to rounding.

The holdings are organized according to the Global Industry Classification Standard, which was developed by and is the exclusive property and a service mark of Morgan Stanley Capital International Inc. and Standard & Poor's.

About risk

As with any mutual fund investment, loss of money is a risk of investing. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit in a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other governmental agency. The risks associated with an investment in the Fund can increase during times of significant market volatility. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are:

Market Risk. The market values of the Fund’s investments, and therefore the value of the Fund’s shares, will go up and down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Market risk may affect a single issuer, industry or section of the economy, or it may affect the market as a whole. The value of the Fund’s investments may go up or down due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to the particular issuer, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for revenues or corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates, regional or global instability, natural or environmental disasters, widespread disease or other public health issues, war, acts of terrorism or adverse investor sentiment generally. During a general downturn in the financial markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value. When markets perform well, there can be no assurance that specific investments held by the Fund will rise in value.

Correlation Risk. Because the Fund’s investment strategy seeks to balance risk across three asset classes and, within each asset class, across different countries and investments, to the extent either the asset classes or the selected countries and investments become correlated in a way not anticipated by the Adviser, the Fund’s risk allocation process may result in magnified risks and loss instead of balancing (reducing) the risk of loss.

Derivatives Risk. The value of a derivative instrument depends largely on (and is derived from) the value of an underlying security, currency, commodity, interest rate, index or other asset (each referred to as an underlying asset). In addition to risks relating to the underlying assets, the use of derivatives may include other, possibly greater, risks, including counterparty, leverage and liquidity risks. Counterparty risk is the risk that the counterparty to the derivative contract will default on its obligation to pay the Fund the amount owed or otherwise perform under the derivative contract. Derivatives create leverage risk because they do not require payment up front equal to the economic exposure created by holding a position in the derivative. As a result, an adverse change in the value of the underlying asset could result in the Fund sustaining a loss that is substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative or the anticipated value of the underlying asset, which may make the Fund’s returns more volatile and increase the risk of loss. Derivative instruments may also be less liquid than more traditional investments and the Fund may be unable to sell or close out its derivative positions at a desirable time or price. This risk may be more acute under adverse market conditions, during which the Fund may be most in need of liquidating its derivative positions. Derivatives may also be harder to value, less tax efficient and subject to changing government regulation that could impact the Fund’s ability to use certain derivatives or their cost. The SEC has adopted new regulations related to the use of derivatives and related instruments by registered investment companies. These regulations may limit the Fund’s ability to engage in derivatives transactions and may result in increased costs or require the Fund to modify its investment strategies. Derivatives strategies may not always be successful. For example, derivatives used for hedging or to gain or limit exposure to a particular market segment may not provide the expected benefits, particularly during adverse market conditions. These risks are greater for the Fund than most other mutual funds because the Fund will implement its investment strategy primarily through derivative instruments rather than direct investments in stocks/bonds.

Investing in Stocks Risk. The value of the Fund’s portfolio may be affected by changes in the stock markets. Stock markets may experience significant short-term volatility and may fall or rise sharply at times. Adverse events in any part of the equity or fixed-income markets may have unexpected negative effects on other market segments. Different stock markets may behave differently from each other and U.S. stock markets may move in the opposite direction from one or more foreign stock markets.

The prices of individual stocks generally do not all move in the same direction at the same time. However, individual stock prices tend to go up and down more dramatically than those of certain other types of investments, such as bonds. A variety of factors can negatively affect the price of a particular company’s stock. These factors may include, but are not limited to: poor earnings reports, a loss of customers, litigation against the company, general unfavorable performance of the company’s sector or industry, or changes in government regulations affecting the company or its industry. To the extent that securities of a particular type are emphasized (for example foreign stocks, stocks of small- or mid-cap companies, growth or value stocks, or stocks of companies in a particular industry), fund share values may fluctuate more in response to events affecting the market for those types of securities.

Commodity Risk. The Fund may have investment exposure to the commodities markets and/or a particular sector of the commodities markets, which may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, such as stocks and bonds. Volatility in the commodities markets may be caused by changes in overall market movements, domestic and foreign political and economic events and policies, war, acts of terrorism, changes in domestic or foreign interest rates and/or investor expectations concerning interest rates, domestic and foreign inflation rates, investment and trading activities of mutual funds, hedge funds and commodities funds, and factors such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and other regulatory developments or supply and demand disruptions. Because the Fund’s performance may be linked to the performance of volatile commodities, investors should be willing to assume the risks of potentially significant fluctuations in the value of the Fund’s shares.

Commodities Tax Risk. The tax treatment of commodity-linked derivative instruments may be adversely affected by changes in legislation, regulations or other legally binding authority. If, as a result of any such adverse action, the income of the Fund from certain commodity-linked derivatives was treated as non-qualifying income, the Fund might fail to qualify as a regulated investment company and be subject to federal income tax at the Fund level. As a result of an announcement by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the Fund intends to invest in commodity-linked notes: (a) directly, relying on an opinion of counsel confirming that income from such investments should be qualifying income because such commodity-linked notes constitute securities under section 2(a)(36) of the 1940 Act or (b) indirectly through the Subsidiary. Should the IRS issue further guidance, or Congress enact legislation, that adversely affects the tax treatment of the Fund’s use of commodity-linked notes or the Subsidiary (which guidance might be applied to the Fund retroactively), it could, among other consequences, limit the Fund’s ability to pursue its investment strategy.

Commodity-Linked Notes Risk. In addition to risks associated with the underlying commodities, investments in commodity-linked notes may be subject to additional risks, such as non-payment of interest and loss of principal, counterparty risk, lack of a secondary market and risk of greater volatility than traditional equity and debt securities. The value of the commodity-linked notes the Fund buys may fluctuate significantly because the values of the underlying investments to which they are linked are themselves volatile. Additionally, certain commodity-linked notes employ “economic” leverage by requiring payment by the issuer of an amount that is a multiple of the price increase or decrease of the underlying commodity, commodity index, or other economic variable. Such economic leverage will increase the volatility of the value of these commodity-linked notes and the Fund to the extent it invests in such notes.

Foreign Securities Risk. The Fund’s foreign investments may be adversely affected by political and social instability, changes in economic or taxation policies, difficulty in enforcing obligations, decreased liquidity or increased volatility. Foreign investments also involve the risk of the possible seizure, nationalization or expropriation of the issuer or foreign deposits (in which the Fund could lose its entire investments in a certain market) and the possible adoption of foreign governmental restrictions such as exchange controls. Foreign companies generally may be subject to less stringent regulations than U.S. companies, including financial reporting requirements and auditing and accounting controls, and may therefore be more susceptible to fraud or corruption. There may be less public information available about foreign companies than U.S. companies, making it difficult to evaluate those foreign companies. Unless the Fund has hedged its foreign currency exposure, foreign securities risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Currency hedging strategies, if used, are not always successful.

Emerging Market Securities Risk. Emerging markets (also referred to as developing markets) are generally subject to greater market volatility, political, social and economic instability, uncertain trading markets and more governmental limitations on foreign investment than more developed markets. In addition, companies operating in emerging markets may be subject to lower trading volume and greater price fluctuations than companies in more developed markets. Such countries’ economies may be more dependent on relatively few industries or investors that may be highly vulnerable to local and global changes. Companies in emerging market countries generally may be subject to less stringent regulatory, disclosure, financial reporting, accounting, auditing and recordkeeping standards than companies in more developed countries. As a result, information, including financial information, about such companies may be less available and reliable, which can impede the Fund’s ability to evaluate such companies. Securities law and the enforcement of systems of taxation in many emerging market countries may change quickly and unpredictably, and the ability to bring and enforce actions (including bankruptcy, confiscatory taxation, expropriation, nationalization of a company’s assets, restrictions on foreign ownership of local companies, restrictions on withdrawing assets from the country, protectionist measures and practices such as share blocking), or to obtain information needed to pursue or enforce such actions, may be limited. In addition, the ability of foreign entities to participate in privatization programs of certain developing or emerging market countries may be limited by local law. Investments in emerging market securities may be subject to additional transaction costs, delays in settlement procedures, unexpected market closures, and lack of timely information.

Debt Securities Risk. The prices of debt securities held by the Fund will be affected by changes in interest rates, the creditworthiness of the issuer and other factors. An increase in prevailing interest rates typically causes the value of existing debt securities to fall and often has a greater impact on longer-duration debt securities and higher quality debt securities. Falling interest rates will cause the Fund to reinvest the proceeds of debt securities that have been repaid by the issuer at lower interest rates. Falling interest rates may also reduce the Fund’s distributable income because interest payments on floating rate debt instruments held by the Fund will decline. The Fund could lose money on investments in debt securities if the issuer or borrower fails to meet its obligations to make interest payments and/or to repay principal in a timely manner. Changes in an issuer’s financial strength, the market’s perception of such strength or in the credit rating of the issuer or the security may affect the value of debt securities. The Adviser’s credit analysis may fail to anticipate such changes, which could result in buying a debt security at an inopportune time or failing to sell a debt security in advance of a price decline or other credit event.

Changing Fixed Income Market Conditions Risk. The current low interest rate environment was created in part by the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) and certain foreign central banks keeping the federal funds and equivalent foreign rates near historical lows. Increases in the federal funds and equivalent foreign rates may expose fixed income markets to heightened volatility and reduced liquidity for certain fixed income investments, particularly those with longer maturities. In addition, decreases in fixed income dealer market-making capacity may also potentially lead to heightened volatility and reduced liquidity in the fixed income markets. As a result, the value of the Fund’s investments and share price may decline. Changes in central bank policies could also result in higher than normal shareholder redemptions, which could potentially increase portfolio turnover and the Fund’s transaction costs.

Foreign Government Debt Risk. Investments in foreign government debt securities (sometimes referred to as sovereign debt securities) involve certain risks in addition to those relating to foreign securities or debt securities generally. The issuer of the debt or the governmental authorities that control the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay principal or interest when due in accordance with the terms of such debt, and the Fund may have limited recourse in the event of a default against the defaulting government. Without the approval of debt holders, some governmental debtors have in the past been able to reschedule or restructure their debt payments or declare moratoria on payments.

LIBOR Transition Risk. The Fund may have investments in financial instruments that utilize the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) as the reference or benchmark rate for variable interest rate calculations. LIBOR is intended to measure the rate generally at which banks can lend and borrow from one another in the relevant currency on an unsecured basis. Regulators and financial industry working groups in several jurisdictions have worked over the past several years to identify alternative reference rates (“ARRs”) to replace LIBOR and to assist with the transition to the new ARRs. In connection with the transition, on March 5, 2021 the UK Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), the regulator that oversees LIBOR, announced that the majority of LIBOR rates would cease to be published or would no longer be representative on January 1, 2022. Consequently, the publication of most LIBOR rates ceased at the end of 2021, but a selection of widely used USD LIBOR rates continues to be published until June 2023 to allow for an orderly transition away from these rates. Additionally, key regulators have instructed banking institutions to cease entering into new contracts that reference these USD LIBOR settings after December 31, 2021, subject to certain limited exceptions.

There remains uncertainty and risks relating to the continuing LIBOR transition and its effects on the Fund and the instruments in which the Fund invests. For example, there can be no assurance that the composition or characteristics of any ARRs or financial instruments in which the Fund invests that utilize ARRs will be similar to or produce the same value or economic equivalence as LIBOR or that these instruments will have the same volume or liquidity. Additionally, although regulators have generally prohibited banking institutions from entering into new contracts that reference those USD LIBOR settings that continue to exist, there remains uncertainty and risks relating to certain “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments that were issued or entered into before December 31, 2021 and the process by which a replacement interest rate will be identified and implemented into these instruments when USD LIBOR is ultimately discontinued. The effects of such uncertainty and risks in “legacy” USD LIBOR instruments held by the Fund could result in losses to the Fund.

Short Position Risk. Because the Fund’s potential loss on a short position arises from increases in the value of the asset sold short, the Fund will incur a loss on a short position, which is theoretically unlimited, if the price of the asset sold short increases from the short sale price. The counterparty to a short position or other market factors may prevent the Fund from closing out a short position at a desirable time or price and may reduce or eliminate any gain or result in a loss. In a rising market, the Fund’s short positions will cause the Fund to underperform the overall market and its peers that do not engage in shorting. If the Fund holds both long and short positions, and both positions decline simultaneously, the short positions will not provide any buffer (hedge) from declines in value of the Fund’s long positions. Certain types of short positions involve leverage, which may exaggerate any losses, potentially more than the actual cost of the investment, and will increase the volatility of the Fund’s returns.

Exchange-Traded Funds Risk. In addition to the risks associated with the underlying assets held by the exchange-traded fund, investments in exchange-traded funds are subject to the following additional risks: (1) an exchange-traded fund’s shares may trade above or below its net asset value; (2) an active trading market for the exchange-traded fund’s shares may not develop or be maintained; (3) trading an exchange-traded fund’s shares may be halted by the listing exchange; (4) a passively managed exchange-traded fund may not track the performance of the reference asset; and (5) a passively managed exchange-traded fund may hold troubled securities. Investment in exchange-traded funds may involve duplication of management fees and certain other expenses, as the Fund indirectly bears its proportionate share of any expenses paid by the exchange-traded funds in which it invests. Further, certain exchange-traded funds in which the Fund may invest are leveraged, which may result in economic leverage, permitting the Fund to gain exposure that is greater than would be the case in an unlevered instrument and potentially resulting in greater volatility.

Exchange-Traded Notes Risk. Exchange-traded notes are subject to credit risk, counterparty risk, and the risk that the value of the exchange-traded note may drop due to a downgrade in the issuer’s credit rating. The value of an exchange-traded note may also be influenced by time to maturity, level of supply and demand for the exchange-traded note, volatility and lack of liquidity in the underlying market, changes in the applicable interest rates, and economic, legal, political, or geographic events that affect the referenced underlying market or assets. The Fund will bear its proportionate share of any fees and expenses borne by an exchange-traded note in which it invests. For certain exchange-traded notes, there may be restrictions on the Fund’s right to redeem its investment, which is meant to be held until maturity.

Factor-Based Strategy Risk. Although the Fund may have investments that track equity indices that emphasize exposure to companies associated with certain characteristics, known as style factors, there is no guarantee that this strategy will be successful.

Volatility Risk. Certain of the Fund’s investments may appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time.

Subsidiary Risk. By investing in the Subsidiary, the Fund is indirectly exposed to risks associated with the Subsidiary’s investments. The Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (1940 Act), and, except as otherwise noted in this prospectus, is not subject to the investor protections of the 1940 Act. Changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands, under which the Fund and the Subsidiary, respectively, are organized, could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this prospectus and the SAI, and could negatively affect the Fund and its shareholders.

Money Market Fund Risk. Although money market funds generally seek to preserve the value of an investment at $1.00 per share, the Fund may lose money by investing in money market funds. A money market fund’s sponsor has no legal obligation to provide financial support to the money market fund. The credit quality of a money market fund’s holdings can change rapidly in certain markets, and the default of a single holding could have an adverse impact on the money market fund’s share price. A money market fund’s share price can also be negatively affected during periods of high redemption pressures, illiquid markets and/or significant market volatility.

U.S. Government Obligations Risk. Obligations of U.S. Government agencies and authorities receive varying levels of support and may not be backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, which could affect the Fund’s ability to recover should they default. No assurance can be given that the U.S. Government will provide financial support to its agencies and authorities if it is not obligated by law to do so.

Financial Markets Regulatory Risk. Policy changes by the U.S. government or its regulatory agencies and political events within the U.S. and abroad may, among other things, affect investor and consumer confidence and increase volatility in the financial markets, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree, which may adversely impact the Fund’s operations, universe of potential investment options, and return potential.

Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and depends heavily on the Adviser’s judgment about markets, interest rates or the attractiveness, relative values, liquidity, or potential appreciation of particular investments made for the Fund’s portfolio. The Fund could experience losses if these judgments prove to be incorrect. Because the Fund’s investment process relies heavily on its asset allocation process, market movements that are counter to the portfolio managers’ expectations may have a significant adverse effect on the Fund’s net asset value. Additionally, legislative, regulatory, or tax developments may adversely affect management of the Fund and, therefore, the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.